A Mother’s Love and Possibly the Best Advice Ever!

Steph-and-Mom-200x150

A polititian and an author. Interviewing two inspiring women who seem to have a lot of differences, but as I found out, like with most of us  –  we are more similar than we are different.  Listen in to this inspiring podcast as Patricia Morgan shares her heart-wrenching stories  about how she kept her sanity while watching her daughter battle addictions and Christine Melnick talks about how to help locally and globally.

Your Life, Unlimited with Stephanie Staples, Patricia Morgan and Christine Melnick

Enjoy Patricia’s guest blog post here:

Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia began the campaign that brought about the official observance of Mother’s Day. Her mother died, and Anna wanted all mothers to be remembered. She asked that white carnations be the official mother’s day symbol. In 1914, US President Woodrow Wilson signed the order that made Mother’s Day a national holiday.

Since then, clichés flow on Mother’s Day describing maternal love as a blessing, a rare tenderness or a gift from heaven.

M  is for the millions of things she does for you.

O  is for the endless optimism she has for you.

T  is for the many tears she has shed for you.

H  is for her heart—always opens for you.

E   is for her endless patience, endless kindness & endless love of you.

R  is for ridiculous. This is ridiculous!  Who could possibility live up to this standard?

I know I do not and never did.  I am the resilient survivor of 3 children and they are survivors of me and myhubby. The first was planned. That’s Benjamin. The second was planned and adopted. That’s Kelly. The third was “Oh! Oh! Les, our birth control didn’t work.” That’s Katie and we’re so glad she came to us!  They are now grown and their own life agents.

If you ask them about the mothering they received, you would hear three different descriptions.  Benjamin calls me “Mom.” Katie calls me “Mother,” and Kelly called me “MooMoo.”  No, I am not still nursing any of them!

Carolyn Myss, in her book, Sacred Contracts, describes mother archetypes: Notice if you have experienced or witnessed any of these:

  • The Good Mother archetype is filled with compassion and forgiveness for her children and puts them before herself.  She can become the beloved martyr.
  • The Perfect Mother archetype is described in Judith Warner’s book, Perfect Madness.  Some women go to outrageous lengths to fulfill a societal expectation of perfect motherhood. But do we not need to let our children down so they leave home?

Then there are the Shadow Mother Archetypes:

  • The Devouring Mother consumes her children psychologically and emotionally often instilling in them feelings of guilt at leaving her or becoming independent.
  • The Abusive or Abandoning Mother violates natural laws by harming her own children. In A Boy Called It, Dave Pelzer describes his mentally ill mother’s attempts to kill him.

The Career Mom archetype is a modern phenomenon of women who struggle with mixed feelings of accomplishment and guilt.

Note: If you are interested in learning more Myss has descriptions plus suggested movies and books on her website of  the different archetypes we live out in our relationships.

Oprah Winfrey said, “Biology is the least of what makes someone a mother.” We do women and men a disservice pigeon holing their ability to nurture, or not, into straight jackets. A couple of years ago, I was asked to speak at Adoption Options, an agency that demonstrates flexibility in its placements. One couple who had adopted a petite yet vibrant little girl were two men.

Love and care come in many different forms, sometimes a match, sometimes a mismatch. We do not choose our mother or father but we can choose to give ourselves the kind of love we understand and long for.

If you are or were blessed, as I was, to have a dear of a mother, do take the opportunity to express your love and appreciation of her but don’t forget others who nurture with care, attention and comfort.

What are your experiences of the word “mother?”

***

The podcast is here for your listening pleasure…Your Life, Unlimited with Stephanie Staples, Patricia Morgan and Christine Melnick

 

Stephanie Staples, CSP* is the author of When Enlightening Strikes – Creating a Mindset for Uncommon Success and an internationally acclaimed motivational speaker. She empowers audiences & clients across North America to bring their ‘A’ game to work and to life. Stephanie has a special interest in working with and empowering nurses and healthcare providers. She happily calls Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada home. You can get loads of complimentary resources to help with issues such as work/life balance, wellness, stress management and happiness in general, as well as find out more information about her coaching and speaking services at http://www.YourLifeUnlimited.ca.

* Certified Speaking Professional (CSP), conferred by the National Speakers Association is the speaking profession’s international measure of professional platform proficiency. Less than 10 percent of speakers have earned this credential and are recognized as some of the best in their fields. Stephanie was one of only five professional speakers in Canada (and the only woman) to attain this designation in 2013.

– See more at: http://yourlifeunlimited.ca/life-is-a-marathon/#sthash.tuoYr6TQ.dpuf

TwitterFacebookGoogle+LinkedInPinterest

2 thoughts on “A Mother’s Love and Possibly the Best Advice Ever!”

  1. Hi Stephanie,
    It was a pleasant surprise to land on this page. I appreciated how you shared ideas of motherhood from Christine Melnick and me. The word ‘mother’ still holds a significant emotional charge for me. I am now shifting into integrating the terms ‘grandmother’ and ‘great-grandmother’. Watching our mother legacy unfold is sometimes troubling. But at other times it arouses curiosity, while most times, if our eyes light up at the sight of our little once, a delight!

    Bravo to your work!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Privacy  |  Site Map ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. © Stephanie Staples 2018